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New demo
Friday, May 23, 2003 | Permalink

A new demo is up on the 3D page showing off the famous Detail Preserving Simplification technique which seems to be the technique of the future when it comes to making detailed characters. Some developers has already already jumped on the bandwagon, for instance will Doom III use this technique and CryTek already offers their PolyBump tools for this. There is also a free command line tool available at ATi's developer pages.

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hornet
Friday, May 23, 2003

Seems to me, that the only thing that needs focus now is decent silhuette... any ideas in that area?


\\hornet

Humus
Friday, May 23, 2003

Truform?

Massimo
Friday, May 23, 2003

Wow.
The fact it makes shiluette computations much faster is probably the best thing about this.

Ignacio
Saturday, May 24, 2003

You should probably use a different name for the technique, PolyBump is the name of a product, the name of the technique should be Appearance Preserving Simplification, or appearance attribute extraction. There are a lot of papers that refer to this technique with those names.

Humus
Saturday, May 24, 2003

Guess I'll have to admit I'm as sloppy as everyone else. The real name is of course as you say, though many people sloppily refers to it as PolyBump.
Alright, I'll change it though.

Cignoni
Saturday, May 24, 2003

Sorry for being pedantic, but just to be precise, "Appearance Preserving Simplification" is not the correct name of the technique. APS refers to a rather complicated way of simplifying a mesh in order to preserve the normal maps. The general technique used by ATI in polybump to build a normal map for a simplified object given a high resolution model, is called "detail preserving" and it is the one presented for the first time in:

P. Cignoni, C. Montani, C. Rocchini, R. Scopigno
"A general method for recovering attribute values on simplifed meshes"
Visualization '98 Conference Proceedings 1998, pp 59-66.

Available on the web on:
http://vcg.isti.cnr.it/publications/publications.htm

Humus
Saturday, May 24, 2003

Ugh! Guess, guess I'll have to update it again then
Regardless of name, it's a cool technique anyway

NeoKenobi
Saturday, May 24, 2003

Isn't this PolyBump technique (or whatever it is called) the same as bumpmapping?

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